Prof Julian Richards

Professor in Security/Intelligence Studies

julian.richards@buckingham.ac.uk

Professor Julian Richards gained a PhD in political violence in Pakistan, at Cambridge University, in 1993. He then spent nearly 20 years working in intelligence and security for the British Government, returning to academic life as a Research Fellow with Brunel University’s Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies in 2006. In 2008, he jointly founded the new Centre for Security and Intelligence Studies (BUCSIS) at the University of Buckingham, and became a full-time member of staff at the university two years later. As a Professor in the department, he is Programme Director for three MA programmes and the convenor of BUCSIS’s research school of MPhil and DPhil students.

Julian Richards is the author of four books and a number of papers and book chapters on a range of security and intelligence issues. He has given formal evidence to Government inquiries on privacy and security issues and is a regular media commentator on security and intelligence issues for national and international television and radio, including the BBC, Sky News, Al Jazeera, LBC radio, and the Islam Channel. His current research interests include a range of issues concerning global security and security policy; questions of extremism and radicalization; and the development of techniques in intelligence analysis.

Selected Publications

  • Anthony Glees & Julian Richards, Freelancing and National Security
  • The Art and Science of Intelligence Analysis (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010)
  • Anthony Glees & Julian Richards, “International terrorism: the neglected domestic dimension”
  • Julian Richards, “Globalization and the rise of Far Right militancy in Europe: a UK perspective”
  • Julian Richards, A Guide to National Security: Threats, Responses and Strategies
  • Julian Richards, “Intelligence dilemma? Contemporary counter-terrorism in a liberal democracy”
  • Julian Richards, “Peddling Hard: Further Questions about the Intelligence Cycle in the Contemporary Era”, in Mark Phythian (ed.), Understanding the Intelligence Cycle (London: Routledge, 2013), 43-55
  • Julian Richards, “Intelligence, Counter-Insurgency and Reconstruction: Intelligence and International Cooperation in Afghanistan”, Inteligencia y Seguridad: Revista de analisis y prospectiva 13 (2013), 167-192
  • Julian Richards, “The Contribution of Alan Turing to British Intelligence”, in A. Beckman & B. Loewe (eds), Acts of the Programme: Semantics and Syntax (London: College Publications, 2013), 75-83
  • Julian Richards, “Signals intelligence”, in R. Dover, M. Goodman and C. Hillebrand (eds), The Routledge Companion to Intelligence Studies (London: Routledge, 2013), ch.8
  • Julian Richards, Cyber-War: The Anatomy of the Global Security Threat (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014)
  • Julian Richards, “Cyber Warfare”, in D. Armstrong (ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in International Relations (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014)
  • Julian Richards, “The Rise of Far-Right Extremism in Contemporary Great Britain and Continental Europe”, Concordia Discors (Russia) 3/26 (2015), 166-175
  • Julian Richards, “Pakistani intelligence and India”, in P. Maddrell (ed.), The Image of the Enemy (Washington DC: Georgetown University Press, 2015), ch.7
  • Julian Richards, “Needles in haystacks: Law, capability, ethics and proportionality in Big-Data intelligence gathering”, in A. Bunnik, A. Cawley, M. Mulqueen & A. Zwitter (eds), Big Data Challenges (Society, Security, Innovation and Ethics) (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), 73-84
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