Dr Philip Fine

BA (Hons), MA (Hons) (Cambridge), DPhil (Oxford)

Philip joined Buckingham in 1996, when finishing a DPhil on face processing and hemispheric asymmetry at the University of Oxford. He teaches courses in Cognition, Perception, Biological Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience & Neuropsychology. He is a Graduate member of the BPS and a member of SEMPRE (Society for Education, Music and Psychology Research) and ESCOM (European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music). Being a singer and pianist, it is not surprising that his interests moved towards the area of music psychology in which he both researches and supervises student projects.

Research interests: Philip’s main area of research concerns the psychology of music, in particular the cognitive processes involved in expert sight-singing. Current investigations also include those into the factors affecting the understanding of sung lyrics, mental rehearsal in musicians, and memory for musical speed. He is also interested in expert problem solving, and is currently involved in research into cryptic crossword and sudoku solving. Other areas of interest include various aspects of cognition (time estimation, memory and language) and perception (visual and auditory), and of cognitive neuropsychology, such as face processing and hemispheric asymmetry. Philip is particularly interested in supervising research students for projects on sung text intelligibility, expertise in sight-singing music and expertise and strategies in cryptic crossword completion.

Selected recent publications and conference papers:

Friedlander, K. J. & P. A. Fine, “The grounded expertise components approach in the novel area of cryptic crossword solving”, Frontiers in Psychology 7 (May 2016), 1–21: read more.

Fine, P.A., K.J. Wise, R. Goldemberg & A. Bravo, “Performing musicians’ understanding of the terms ‘mental practice’ and ‘score analysis’”, Psychomusicology: Music, Mind, and Brain 25.1 (2015), 69-82: read more.

Fine, P.A. & J. Ginsborg, “Making myself understood: perceived factors affecting the intelligibility of sung text”, Frontiers in Psychology 5 (2014): read more.

Bravo, A. & P. Fine, Studying a score silently: What benefits can it bring to performance? International Symposium on Performance Science (Auckland, New Zealand), 2009.

Fine, P. & S. Bull, Memory for tactus and musical tempo: The effects of expertise and speed on keeping time. International Symposium on Performance Science (Auckland, New Zealand), 2009.

Fine, P., J. Ginsborg & C. Barlow, The influence of listeners’ singing experience and the number of singers on the understanding of sung text. International Symposium on Performance Science (Auckland, New Zealand), 2009.

Friedlander, K. & P. Fine, Expertise in cryptic crossword performance: An exploratory survey. International Symposium on Performance Science (Auckland, New Zealand), 2009.

Russell, K. & P. Fine, The effects of music tempo on time perception and word search performance. BPS Cognitive Psychology Section 26th Annual Conference (University of Hertfordshire, UK), 2009.

Hoffmann, F. & P. Fine, The role of working memory in solving Sudoku. BPS Cognitive Psychology Section 26th Annual Conference (University of Hertfordshire, UK), 2009.

Fine, P., A. Berry & B. Rosner, The effect of pattern recognition and tonal predictability on sight-singing ability. Psychology of Music 34.4 (2006), 431-447.

Costa, M., P. Fine & P. Ricci Bitti, Interval distributions, mode, and tonal strength of melodies as predictors of perceived emotion. Music Perception 22.1 (2004), 1-14.

Fine, P. & H. Younger, Sight-singing performance and piano accompaniment. 8th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (Northwestern University, Evanston IL, USA), 2004.

Email: philip.fine@buckingham.ac.uk

See also: Psychology Department

Selected Publications

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