Name of Programme
BSc (Hons) Economics, Business and Law
Final Award
BSc (Hons)
Location
Buckingham
Awarding Institution/Body
University Of Buckingham
Teaching Institution
University Of Buckingham
School of Study
School of Humanities and Social Sciences [Economics and International Studies]
Programme Code(s)
UBSF9CEBL / Full Time / 2 Years and 1 Term
Professional Body Accreditation
Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement (SBS)
QAA SBS: Economics (2019)
QAA SBS: Law (2019)
QAA SBS: Business (2019)
Admission Criteria
A-level: BBB-BCC (or equivalent)
IB: 32-30 (or equivalent)
National Diploma: DMM
UCAS tariff: 112
Applicable Cohort(s)
2014
FHEQ Level
6
UCAS Code
LM11
Summary of Programme
This programme permits the most wide-ranging studies. It has, however, an important underlying theme. All business activities take place within a framework of law. Well functioning legal institutions are crucial to economic progress, and the connection between the legal system and the success of business has been shown repeatedly in the 20th Century. Students taking this programme might be aiming to enter the legal profession by going on to take the Common Professional Examination. Their studies at Buckingham might then lead them to specialise in areas of law such as anti-trust, securities regulation, taxation and so forth. Alternatively, the programme is well suited to students who intend to take an MBA degree before entering business. Of course, the programme is also available to students who simply recognise the interface between law, business and economics as a fascinating and crucially important area.
Educational Aims of the Programme
The Economics, Business and Law degree aims to give students a basic knowledge of these disciplines, allowing them to attain a broad appreciation of a wide area of social science. Students from the programme should be equipped to move directly in to employment in business or administration. If a more professional route is required, students might, for example, take some further law courses, for a career in law, or move onto a masters degree in say, economics.
Programme Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

The integration of three separate disciplines to form a synthesis.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Lectures and small group seminars, plus interaction and dialogue with students on a one to one basis. Students are mainly examined by written examination, but in most courses there is an essay requirement of about 10-20% of the total. In addition, most courses require additional essays that are not part of the assessed marks.

These skills cannot, we believe, be communicated directly. They are acquired as part of the general learning process. Of particular importance is extensive reading, which we encourage and dialogue and interaction between students and staff. We consider that interaction between staff and students is essential in an effective degree programme.

Assessment Strategy

The majority of courses are assessed by 3 hour written examinations at the end of the course. In addition there is usually course work, mainly written essays.

Students are expected to attend lectures and tutorials, although such attendance is not made part of the assessment. Typically, the final examination comprises 80-90% of total marks, while the essay makes up the remaining 10%-20%.
Programme Outcomes

Cognitive Skills

(a) As stated, the course aims to give students a broad perception of the three subject areas.

(b) We also attempt to give students an intuitive appreciation of economic, business and legal phenomena and processes, and an awareness of the political context in which they operate.

(c) As far as is possible in an undergraduate degree, we attempt to provide insights into the varieties of thinking used in the three areas. For example, students should become acquainted with the probabilistic thinking used in economics and business as well as with the more reference based thinking use in law.

In the law part of their degree students are required to defend legal positions by defending legal positions in class and occasionally in mooting competitions.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Learning and teaching strategies used to enable outcomes to be achieved and demonstrated Lectures and tutorials. Some courses involve the use of computer simulations and others involve presentations

Assessment Strategy

The majority of courses are assessed by 3 hour written examinations at the end of the course. In addition there is usually course work, mainly written essays.

Students are expected to attend lectures and tutorials, although such attendance is not made part of the assessment. Typically, the final examination comprises 80-90% of total marks, while the essay makes up the remaining 10%-20%.
Programme Outcomes

Practical/Transferable Skills

Students should be able to justify an intellectual position within a group context, and argue that position against the criticisms of other students and members of staff. In many courses students are required to introduce a tutorial subject, for perhaps 10 to 15 minutes, and defend their position.
The distinction between ‘practical’ and other skills is not wholly applicable in an academic degree programme of this sort. In this section we mention that students should acquire many of the numerical skills needed by the economist, including quantitative and statistical methods. Some courses, such as Microeconomic Theory, adopt a problem-centred approach in order to reinforce the more theoretical material presented by lecturers. Students are expected to be computer competent – to be able to use programs such as Office and so on. We also encourage students to learn an additional foreign language while at Buckingham.

The examinations enable us to evaluate the ability of students to sustain an intellectual argument and to marshall evidence. Performance in tutorials is also indicative of these skills.

Some examinations emphasise use of problem solving skills. Use of problem solving sheets in tutorials? A special computer course is arranged in the first year which all students are required to pass. Languages are taught through language laboratory work.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Assessment through essay writing, examinations, presentations and course work

Assessment Strategy

The majority of courses are assessed by 3 hour written examinations at the end of the course. In addition there is usually course work, mainly written essays.

Students are expected to attend lectures and tutorials, although such attendance is not made part of the assessment. Typically, the final examination comprises 80-90% of total marks, while the essay makes up the remaining 10%-20%.
External Reference Points
• Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (Link);
• Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement(s) (Link);
• Other (list)
Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each course unit/module can be found in the departmental or programme handbook. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed annually by the University of Buckingham and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency.
Date of Production
July 2013; Revised Autumn 2019 ; Reviewed Summer 2022
Date approved by School Learning and Teaching Committee
July 2013; Revised Autumn 2019 ; Reviewed Summer 2022
Date approved by School Board of Study
July 2013; Revised Autumn 2019 ; Reviewed Summer 2022
Date approved by University Learning and Teaching Committee
July 2013; Revised Autumn 2019 ; Reviewed Summer 2022
Date of Annual Review
In line with the University Annual Monitoring Review process.

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

BSc (Hons) Economics, Business and Law

UBSF9CEBL / Full Time / September Entry
Term 1
Autumn
Introduction to Legal Studies [L4/15U] (LUFILS1)
Quantitative Methods 1 [L4/15U] (BUFQUM1)
Preliminary 1 Examination
Term 2
Winter
Principles of Microeconomics [L4/15U] (HUFPMIC)
Contemporary Issues in Business and Management [L4/15U] (BUFCPBM)
Term 3
Spring
Principles of Macroeconomics [L4/15U] (HUFPMAC)
Marketing Fundamentals [L4/15U] (BUFMFUN)
Preliminary 2 Examination
Term 4
Summer
Microeconomic Theory [L5/15U] (HUFMICT)
Marketing Management [L5/15U] (BUFMKMT)
Law of Obligation [L5/15U] (BUFLWOB)
Term 5
Autumn
Microeconomic Policy [L5/15U] (HUFMICP)
Sustainable Operations [L5/15U] (BUFSOPS)
Principles of Corporate Law [L5/15U] (BUFPOCL)
Part 1 Examination
Term 6
Winter
One of:
History of Economic Thought [L6/15U]
Industrial Organisation and Strategy [L6/15U] (PPEXXXXX3)
One of:
Psychology of Work [L6/15U]
Managing People and Change [L6/15U]
Finance for Managers [L6/15U] (FBHSSBUSECONXX3)
Law of Torts [L5/30U] (LUFTORT)
Term 7
Spring
One of:
Economics of the Labour market [L6/15U]
Issues in Developing Economies and the MENA region [L6/15U]
Welfare Economics [L6/15U] (FBHSSBUSECONXX1)
Corporate Strategy and Strategic Management [L6/15U] (BUFCSSM)
Law of Torts [L5/30U] (LUFTORT)
(Continued)
Part 2 Stage 1 Examination
Term 8
Summer
One of:
Behavioural Economics [L6/15U]
Money, Banking and Financial Markets [L6/15U] (FBHSSBUSECONXX2)
Business Simulation [L6/15U] (BUFBUSI)
Commercial Law [L6/30U] (LUFCMML)
Term 9
Autumn
International Economics [L6/15U] (HUFIECN)
One of:
Cross-cultural Management [L5/15U]
Globalisation and International Business [L5/15U] (BUECXXXX42)
Commercial Law [L6/30U] (LUFCMML)
(Continued)
Part 2 Stage 2 Examination