Name of Programme
BSc Biomedical Sciences with integrated Foundation
Final Award
BSc (Hons)
Location
Crewe
Awarding Institution/Body
University Of Buckingham
Teaching Institution
University Of Buckingham
School of Study
School of Allied Health
Programme Code(s)
UBSF0SBS / Full Time / 3 Years
Professional Body Accreditation
N/A
Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement (SBS)
Biosciences
Biomedical Science
Admission Criteria
● Typically, recent successful study in English at college level in the natural sciences
● IELTS 6.0 and prior mathematics study
● Details appendicised
Applicable Cohort(s)
From September 2019
FHEQ Level
6
UCAS Code
B903
Summary of Programme
This is a BSc (Hons) degree in Biomedical Sciences studied in 3 years across levels 3 to 6. It is intended as a
preparatory programme for students intending to apply for medicine and dentistry degrees. Students attend for
eight semesters, with an optional additional semester of English and Academic Skills if required. Intermediate
awards are available to students who wish to leave at the end of level 3 (Certificate in Foundation Medical Studies)
or level 4 (Certificate of Higher Education in Medical Sciences). Subject coverage includes the following topics
(note that these are not, in every case, the actual names of the modules).
1) Foundation Biomedicine, from Genes and Cells to System Regulation and Population biology. 2) Foundation
Chemistry, including physical, periodic and organic chemistry. 3) Foundation quantitative studies in mathematics,
physics and introductory computing. 4) Medicine, Disease and Society. 5) Independent Investigation in
Biomedicine. These first five topics comprise the level 3 Certificate in Foundation Medical Studies.
6) The doctor-patient relationship. 7) Molecular Cell Biology. 8) Chemistry and Physics for the Life Sciences. 9)
Neurobiology and Musculoskeletal control. 10) Gastrointestinal function and nutritional biochemistry. 11.
Circulation, breathing and the interior milieu. Modules 6-11 comprise the level 4 CertHE in Medical Sciences.
12 & 13) Integrated pathology and therapeutics. 14) Infection and immunity. 15) Research methods and modelling
approaches. 16) Cell signalling, developmental biology and cancer. 17) Genes, disease and human variation. 18)
Brain and behavior. 19) Independent research project. Modules 12-19 conclude the students’ studies at levels 5 and 6.
Educational Aims of the Programme
The aim is to support potential applicants for medical or dental school with a rigorous scientific education and
professional mentoring, from level 3 onwards. Students are also encouraged to consider alternatives to medicine
and dentistry, including other health professions, high calibre graduate employment, and MSc/PhD study. This aim
is accomplished via the following objectives: to introduce students to the molecular and physiological sciences, the
physical and data sciences underpinning biology/health, and the medical humanities; and to develop students’
cognitive, academic and professional attributes. Further, at the advanced stages of the degree, to educate
students in aspects of pathology and therapeutics, current perspectives in molecular and behavioural medicine, and
the use of research tools to generate original findings in science, medicine and public health. The programme
emphasises concepts, mechanisms, data, and a personal/reflective response to study. Throughout the
programme, students will encounter authentic assessments that test measurable learning outcomes.
Programme Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

1. The preconditions for life, and its regulatory
mechanisms
2. The scale, structure and reactions of
matter.
3. Quantitative approaches to the life
sciences.
4. Historical and social context of health and
health systems
5. Cell function and tissue architecture
6. Cell communication, including endocrine
signals
7. Biochemical pathways and metabolism
8. Macromolecular structure and function
9. Energy and matter transformations in
biology
10. Chemical and physical processes
11. Biophysical modelling
12. Biological information and its transmission
13. Human variation and physiological
evolution
14. Physiological regulation and adaptation
15. Neuroscience and behaviour
16. Skeletomuscular function
17. The main organ systems, their interrelation
and regulation
18. Case studies in human pathology and
therapeutics
19. Pharmacology and medicinal chemistry
20. Pathogens, response to infection, and
immunity
21. Signalling aspects of developmental
biology and cancer
22. Biological and clinical research methods
23. Data critique and evaluation
24. Hypothesis testing and research,
constructing proposals
25. Bioethics, medical ethics, professional
conduct, the doctor-patient relationship

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Explain the teaching and learning methods and
strategies used to help students achieve each part of the
knowledge and understanding
1. Lectures
2. Class tutorials with preparation, including flipped
learning
3. Small group tutorials and task forces
4. Problem based learning, team based learning
5. Feed-forward assignments
6. Student-led sessions (journal clubs, debates &
seminars)
7. Engagement with external events
8. In silico labs
9. Wet labs
10. Directed study
11. Project supervision
12. Personal statement, mock interview practice

Assessment Strategy

Explain the strategies used to assess the achievement
of each part of the knowledge and understanding
1. Essays
2. Case reports
3. Examinations
4. In-class tests
5. Timed open-source tasks
6. Structured problems
7. Assessed seminars and journal club participation
8. Portfolio entries, some on collaborative online
documents
9. Wet and dry lab outputs and reports, including
team modelling projects
10. PBL reports, TBL assessment
11. Presentations, posters, student lectures
12. Mini-reviews and literature surveys
13. Negotiated feedback
14. Dissertation
15. Project notebook
16. Viva voce examination
Programme Outcomes

Cognitive Skills

The programme is designed to promote the
development of these graduate attributes, which
map onto scientific and medical habits of
thought and practice:
1. Analysis of claims
2. Synthesis of sources
3. Interpretation of evidence
4. Critique and decision making
5. Justification of decisions
6. Innovative thinking, hypothesis
formation, generation of experimental
proposal

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Explain the teaching and learning methods and
strategies used to help students achieve each part of the
cognitive skills
1. Lectures
2. Class tutorials with preparation, including flipped
learning
3. Small group tutorials and task forces
4. Problem based learning, team based learning
5. Feed-forward assignments
6. Student-led sessions (journal clubs, debates &
seminars)
7. Engagement with external events
8. In silico labs
9. Wet labs
10. Directed study
11. Project supervision
12. Personal statement, mock interview practice

Assessment Strategy

Explain the strategies used to assess the achievement
of each part of the knowledge and understanding
1. Essays
2. Case reports
3. Examinations
4. In-class tests
5. Timed open-source tasks
6. Structured problems
7. Assessed seminars and journal club
participation
8. Portfolio entries, some on collaborative online
documents
9. Wet and dry lab outputs and reports, including
team modelling projects
10. PBL reports, TBL assessment
11. Presentations, posters, student lectures
12. Mini-reviews and literature surveys
13. Negotiated feedback
14. Extended project writingDissertation
15. Project notebook
16. Viva voce examination
Programme Outcomes

Practical/Transferable Skills

1. Laboratory technique: protocols in cell
biology, chemistry, biochemistry and
anatomy
2. Assessment of histological specimens
3. Bioinformatic skills
4. Practical biomedical modelling
5. Practical statistics, evaluation of evidence,
and meta-analysis
6. Clinical case analysis
7. Generation of original data
8. Preparation of a research proposal;
response to a referee
9. Professional and workplace skills
10. Communicating with impact
11. Information literacy, source retrieval and
selection
Level 5/6 students may undertake student
selected components or ‘wet’ projects in
microbiology, molecular biology or biochemistry.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Explain the teaching and learning methods and
strategies used to help students achieve each part of the
practical/transferable skills
1. Lab exercise: cell biology, neuroscience,
biochemistry, renal system, chemistry.
2. Specimen observation and drawing (including
microscopic)
3. Cadaver lab visit
4. Bioinformatics lab
5. Modelling lab
6. Metaanalysis labs
7. Lectures/demonstrations
8. PBL sessions
9. Coaching in interview technique and CV
preparation
10. Feedback
11. Independent projects/ Dissertation

Assessment Strategy

Explain the strategies used to assess the achievement
of each part of the practical/transferable skills
1. Lab notebook
2. In silico biology assignments
3. Statistics, meta-analysis and genomics
assignments
4. Minireviews
5. Group projects in physical modelling
6. Presentations, seminars, debates.
7. In class tests
8. Reflective journals
9. Mock job application
10.(For projects) Dissertation and viva
External Reference Points
● Framework for Higher Education Qualifications Link

● Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement(s)
Link
Link
Link

Biosciences, Biomedical Science, Medicine
Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each course unit/module can be found in the departmental or programme handbook. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed annually by the University of Buckingham and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency.
Date of Production
Date approved by School Learning and Teaching Committee
Date approved by School Board of Study
Date approved by University Learning and Teaching Committee
Date of Annual Review

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURES