Name of Programme
BA (Hons) English Literature
Final Award
BA (Hons)
Location
Buckingham
Awarding Institution/Body
University Of Buckingham
Teaching Institution
University Of Buckingham
School of Study
School of Humanities and Social Sciences [English and Digital Media]
Programme Code(s)
UBAF9SEL / Full Time / 2 Years and 1 Term
UBAF2SEL / Full Time / 2 Years
Professional Body Accreditation
N/A
Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement (SBS)
QAA SBS: English (2015)
QAA SBS: Creative Writing (2016)
Admission Criteria
A-level: BCC
104 UCAS points
IB 24 or equivalent qualifications
Applicable Cohort(s)
September 2020
FHEQ Level
6
UCAS Code
Q300
Summary of Programme
English Literature shares frontiers with many subjects and has become the central field of humanistic study in UK universities. The University of Buckingham degree programme approaches English Literature as a versatile academic discipline characterised by the rigorous and critical study of literature and language, importantly concerned with the production, reception and interpretation of written texts, primarily literary; and with the nature, history and potential of the English language. We recognise and celebrate that the study of English develops a flexible and responsive openness of mind and sympathy, conceptual sophistication in argument, and the ability to engage in dialogue with past and present cultures and values. Students are given the freedom to choose between a rigorously-designed Single Honours programme, and the combination of a similarly coherent Major programme (240-270 units) in English Literature with 90-120 units of study in a wide range of frontier subjects, including those taught in other Schools of the University. Where ≥90 units at the appropriate FHEQ Levels are selected from a single discipline, and where local pre-requisites are complied with, a combined honours degree will be awarded upon completion. All students are required to complete a capstone Synoptic Study Unit integrating knowledge and understanding from different areas of their study programme, and all have the opportunity to undertake a dissertation project and/or, subject to availability, an external work placement.
Educational Aims of the Programme
The key aims of the Single Honours and Major programmes are to deliver the following:
• Systematic knowledge of the discipline as traditionally constructed by examining a wide range of literature in different genres across different historical periods, but with an emphasis on post-1770 literature, and in particular, study of the twentieth century
• Critically-informed understanding of ways to approach literary texts, and understanding of current critical issues and theories
• The ability to engage closely and in detail with the stylistic and rhetorical features of texts, and to conceive and develop creative works in a self-critical manner and across a range of genres
• The ability to read, write, and speak the language of effective and thorough communication
• The ability to integrate knowledge and understanding from a range of subjects and/or disciplines through a Synoptic Study Unit
• Opportunities for rigorous discussion and debate, encouraged in a tutorial and seminar environment
• Opportunities to demonstrate depth of knowledge, understanding and professional research competence through the core/optional Dissertation project
• Competencies directly relating to employability:
- high-order conceptual, literacy, and communication skills
- intellectual skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
- high-level, fluent, and accurate writing skills
- good IT skills
- recent relevant work experience gained through an External Placement option

The key aims of English Literature with Flexible Honours are:
- To provide knowledge of a range of cognate or contrasting subjects and disciplines selected according to each student’s intellectual interests and career objectives; or, of a single secondary subject/discipline, where ≥90 units are selected at appropriate FHEQ Levels
- To instil understanding of the methodologies and critical approaches, at basic, intermediate and advanced levels, of a range of cognate or contrasting subjects; or, of a single secondary subject/discipline where ≥90 units are selected at appropriate FHEQ Levels and local prerequisites are complied with
- To provide opportunities to synthesise and tailor knowledge and understanding to a bespoke programme of study undertaken with the advice and guidance of the Department of English and Digital Media
- To facilitate the study, either broad or in-depth, of more than one subject/discipline, and to provide a wider range of skills-related outcomes than the study of Single Honours

In the English Department, we also believe in the surpassing value of the reading, discussing, and understanding of great works of literature, both as processes that lead to higher levels of employability and the development of transferable skills, and as ends in themselves that are enriching and, ultimately, liberating. Literature is ethically and emotionally educative. In the words of Iris Murdoch, addressing the issue of ‘two cultures’: ‘the study of a language or a literature or any study that will increase and refine our ability to be through words is part of a battle for civilization . . . for clarity and truth, against vile fake-scientific jargon and spiritless slipshod journalese and tyrannical mystification. There are not two cultures. There is only one culture and words are its basis; words are where we live as human beings and as moral and spiritual agents’ (Writings on Philosophy and Literature, 1997).
Programme Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of their studies, students will be able to:
1. comprehend a substantial number of texts and authors from different periods of literary history (including » 50 units of pre-1800 literature)
2. recognise the principal features of texts written both in literary and non-literary genres
3. compare and distinguish between the cultural, socio-historical, and ideological contexts in which the above are produced and read
4. assess the role of critical traditions and of contemporary critical theory in shaping attitudes to literature
5. recognise the interdisciplinary nature of the study of literature in English and its ethically and emotionally educative dimension
6. understand the practice of verbal creativity in a variety of prescribed and self-selected genres

Flexible Honours specific:
7. knowledge and understanding of a range of cognate or contrasting subjects and disciplines, studied at all three FHEQ Levels
OR
8. knowledge and understanding of a secondary discipline (≥90 units) studied at all three FHEQ Levels

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Modules dealing with specific historical periods and literary movements (including Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama)
2. Seminar and tutorial discussions focussing on detailed reading of texts and their features
3. Lectures, presentations, handouts and MOODLE resources situating texts in their different contexts; theatre workshops (‘Plays in Performance’)
4. Setting and discussion of appropriate critical reading, both historical and contemporary
5. Encourage and facilitate tutorial discussion of the wider emotional, moral, and philosophical dimensions of texts in English
6. Practitioner-led workshops to encourage: maintenance of writer’s diaries, drafting and development of work in progress, and the presenting/’pitching’ of completed work

Flexible Honours specific:
7. Context-dependent strategies from a range or single secondary discipline(s)

Assessment Strategy

1. Module essays
2. Unseen examinations
3. In-class tests
4. Presentations
5. Formative assessment – presentations, class discussion (especially skills 1, 3, 4 and 5)

Flexible Honours specific:
6. Experience of a variety of Free Choice or Flexible Option programme assessment strategies
Programme Outcomes

Cognitive Skills

1. Read and describe a text closely in formal terms (stylistic, rhetorical, generic, etc.)
2. Evaluate reasoning and arguments in relation to evidence from different sources and interpretations
3. Articulate responses to the effective power of literature and its aesthetic qualities
4. Show awareness of how, historically, different social and cultural assumptions have operated inherently in the production and reception of literary texts
5. Research, plan, and structure effective critical papers, and style and reference material accurately
6. Produce artistically coherent, original and technically sophisticated creative work

Flexible Honours specific:
7. Apply techniques and methods of critical analysis appropriate to a range of cognate or contrasting subjects across the range of FHEQ Levels
OR
8. Apply techniques and methods of critical analysis appropriate to a secondary discipline (≥90 units) across the range of FHEQ Levels

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Close analysis through lectures (up to 30), seminar activities, and tutorials (4–7 students) of a text’s formal qualities
2. Setting reading and chairing subsequent tutorial debates over the central critical issues raised by set texts, as preparation for writing evaluative essays
3. Stimulating responses to texts ‘in performance’, either through reading by the lecturer and/or student, through high-quality recordings, or the watching of digital AV materials
4. Lecture and tutorial explanations of historical difference and cultural change
5. Provide detailed and up-to-date bibliographies for each module (both print and web); give detailed feedback on students’ essay drafts; provide a departmental Style Guide on presentation, referencing, etc
6. Provide instruction and advice on development from leading practitioner(s) in creative practice

Flexible Honours specific:
7. Context-dependent strategies from a range of or single secondary discipline(s)

Assessment Strategy

1. Module essays
2. Unseen examinations
3. In-class tests
4. Presentations
5. Formative assessment

Flexible Honours specific:
6. Experience of a variety of Free Choice or Flexible Option programme assessment strategies
Programme Outcomes

Practical/Transferable Skills

1. Skills of intellectual analysis, discrimination, and evaluation
2. High-order communication skills, including the ability to present written and oral arguments persuasively
3. Ability to develop intricate arguments in an open-ended way and to negotiate solutions
4. Capacity for independent thought and judgement, including appreciation of alternative perspectives
5. Receptivity and detailed attention to others’ points of view and emotional intelligence of response.
6. Research skills, including advanced information retrieval, note-taking, and organisational abilities.
7. Up-to-date IT skills, including familiarity with word-processing software and Internet- searching.
8. Drafting, editing, and (creative) presentational skills suitable for professional publications.
9. Effective time-management and basic project-management skills

Flexible Honours specific:
10. Skills-related outcomes derived from a bespoke range of cognate or contrasting disciplines
OR
11. Skills-related outcomes deriving from a single secondary discipline (≥90 units)

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Prescribing different and sometimes conflicting readings of set texts for analysis, to demonstrate the need for synthesis and evaluation
2. Modules designed to involve students continuously in communicating ideas and responses, both formally and informally (through research reports, debate, and tutorial discussion)
3. Interactive process of drafting reports, essays, and mini-dissertation material with tutors
4. Students challenged continually in development of assessed material, to appraise and judge different intellectual positions and to engage constructively with them
5. Weekly, detailed tutorial discussions amongst small groups of students (4–7)
6. On-going instruction in use of Library & Information Services, and advice on studying patterns (Personal Tutor system)
7. Students required to submit coursework using word- processing software, and to access resources and submission portals via MOODLE, the University VLE
8. Detailed feedback on grammar, style, and presentation of written work; provision of Department’s own Style Guide; discussion of draft coursework, where possible
9. Specifying deadlines throughout the academic year for the submission of different tasks and reports, and advising students on how to meet them (Personal Tutor system)

Assessment Strategy

1. Module essays
2. Unseen examinations
3. In-class tests
4. Presentations
5. Formative assessment

Flexible Honours specific:
6. Experience of a variety of Free Choice or Flexible Option programme assessment strategies
External Reference Points
• Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (Link);
• Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement(s) Link
Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each course unit/module can be found in the departmental or programme handbook. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed annually by the University of Buckingham and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency.
Date of Production
Autumn 2019
Date approved by School Learning and Teaching Committee
Autumn 2019
Date approved by School Board of Study
Autumn 2019
Date approved by University Learning and Teaching Committee
Autumn 2019
Date of Annual Review
In line with the University Annual Monitoring Review process.

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

BA (Hons) English Literature

UBAF2SEL / Full Time / January Entry
Term 1
Winter
Poetry and Poetics [L4/15U] (HUFPAP4)
Victorian Literature [L5/15U] (HUFVLIT)
Eras of English [L4/15U] (HUFEENG) ***
Term 2
Spring
Fiction and Theory [L4/15U] (HUFFAT4)
Children’s Literature [L4/15U] (HUFCHIL)
Plays in Performance [L4/15U] (HUFPLPE) ***
Preliminary 1 Examination
Term 3
Summer
Creative Writing 1 [L5/15U] (HUFCWR1) *
Rewriting Empire [L5/15U] (HUFREWE)
Twentieth Century Theatre [L5/15U] (HUFTCTH)
Term 4
Autumn
Reading Genders [L5/15U] (HUFRGN5)
Literary Journalism 1642-Present [L5/15U] (HUFLJ1P)
Gothic Sensation and Science Fiction [L5/15U] (HUFGOTH)
Part 1 Examination
Term 5
Winter
The Long Eighteenth Century [L6/15U] (HUFL18C)
Inklings and their Influences [L6/15U] (HUFINKI)
Dissertation (English Literature) [L6/30U] (HUFDS30)
Term 6
Spring
Modern American Literature [L6/15U] (HUFMALT)
Book, Script, Film [L5/15U] (HUFBKSF)
Dissertation (English Literature) [L6/30U] (HUFDS30)
(Continued)
Part 2 Stage 1 Examination
Term 7
Summer
Shakespearean Drama [L6/15U] (HUFSHDR)
Modernist Writing [L6/15U] (HUFMDWR)
Creative Writing 2 [L6/15U] (HUFCWR2) **
Term 8
Autumn
Renaissance Literature [L6/15U] (HUFRENL)
Contemporary Writing [L6/15U] (HUFCTWR)
Synoptic Study Unit [L6/15U] (HUFSYNO)
Part 2 Stage 2 Examination

*** At the discretion of the Programme Director, this module may be replaced by a Free Choice, if there are insufficient numbers to run the module.
* At the discretion of the Programme Director, an appropriate 15-unit English Literature module may be substituted for Creative Writing 1.
** At the discretion of the Programme Director, and subject to the availability of a suitable placement opportunity, External Placement (HUFEXPL) may be substituted for Creative Writing 2.

 

BA (Hons) English Literature

UBAF9SEL / Full Time / September Entry
Term 1
Autumn
Eras of English [L4/15U] (HUFEENG)
Plays in Performance [L4/15U] (HUFPLPE)
Preliminary 1 Examination
Term 2
Winter
Poetry and Poetics [L4/15U] (HUFPAP4)
Victorian Literature [L5/15U] (HUFVLIT)
Term 3
Spring
Fiction and Theory [L4/15U] (HUFFAT4)
Children’s Literature [L4/15U] (HUFCHIL)
Preliminary 2 Examination
Term 4
Summer
Creative Writing 1 [L4/15U] (HUFCW41) *
Rewriting Empire [L5/15U] (HUFREWE)
Twentieth Century Theatre [L5/15U] (HUFTCTH)
Term 5
Autumn
Reading Genders [L5/15U] (HUFRGN5)
Literary Journalism 1642-Present [L5/15U] (HUFLJ1P)
Gothic Sensation and Science Fiction [L5/15U] (HUFGOTH)
Part 1 Examination
Term 6
Winter
The Long Eighteenth Century [L6/15U] (HUFL18C)
Inklings and their Influences [L6/15U] (HUFINKI)
Dissertation (English Literature) [L6/30U] (HUFDS30)
Term 7
Spring
Modern American Literature [L6/15U] (HUFMALT)
Book, Script, Film [L5/15U] (HUFBKSF)
Dissertation (English Literature) [L6/30U] (HUFDS30)
(Continued)
Part 2 Stage 1 Examination
Term 8
Summer
Shakespearean Drama [L6/15U] (HUFSHDR)
Modernist Writing [L6/15U] (HUFMDWR)
Creative Writing 2 [L6/15U] (HUFCWR2) **
Term 9
Autumn
Renaissance Literature [L6/15U] (HUFRENL)
Contemporary Writing [L6/15U] (HUFCTWR)
Synoptic Study Unit [L6/15U] (HUFSYNO)
Part 2 Stage 2 Examination

* At the discretion of the Programme Director, an appropriate 15-unit English Literature module may be substituted for Creative Writing 1.
** At the discretion of the Programme Director, and subject to the availability of a suitable placement opportunity, External Placement (HUFEXPL) may be substituted for Creative Writing 2.