Name of Programme
MA United Nations and Diplomatic Studies
Final Award
MA
Location
Buckingham
Awarding Institution/Body
University Of Buckingham
Teaching Institution
University Of Buckingham
School of Study
School of Humanities and Social Sciences [Economics and International Studies]
Programme Code(s)
PMAF1PUNDS / Full Time / 1 Year
Professional Body Accreditation
Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement (SBS)
QAA Master’s Degrees:
Link
See: Aims (below)
Admission Criteria
Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited institution.
Applicable Cohort(s)
September 2018
FHEQ Level
7
UCAS Code
Summary of Programme
The degree provides a firm grounding in diplomatic theory and practice. It covers the history and operation of diplomacy; the causes of conflict and strategies for conflict resolution; the nature and operation of international organisations, including the United Nations and its agencies; the development and global role of supranational organisations, especially the European Union (with an emphasis on its external policies); global political communication, including the media and new forms of communication; the practice of great power politics.

It is taught from the Centre for United Nations Studies.
Educational Aims of the Programme
A graduate in this programme should be able to:
1. Analyse international institutions and their practices, especially the United Nations;
2. Apply strategies for resolving conflicts, with special reference to the UN;
3. Explain the evolution of diplomacy and distinguish different types of diplomacy and diplomatic practice;
4. Conceptualise different forms of global communication;
5. Locate diplomacy within the wider context of international relations.

The programme is consistent with the QAA benchmark statement on the generic features of a Master’s degree. Specifically it falls under Category 2: specialised/advanced degree. It is a taught degree and contains research training. Research training is delivered through the individual modules and in classes supporting the Dissertation. The degree contains a significant research project. It carries 180 units (all at Level 7).
Programme Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

1. Values: the ability to evaluate positions in terms of right/wrong and good/bad.
2. Human behaviour: the empirical analysis of human cognition and motivation, both individual and collective.
3. Institutional design: the study of the evolution and reform of major international institutions.
4. Area studies: capacity to integrate diverse knowledge to understand a region/country.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. The broad range of modules ensures that students cover the areas outlined under ‘knowledge and understanding’.
2. Seminars provide an overview of each of the areas.
3. Small group tutorials facilitate focused discussion of the material introduced in the lectures.
4. The use of internet resources, such as moodle, facilitate independent study.
5. The availability of staff ensures that students get the necessary support successfully to complete their studies.

Assessment Strategy

1. Module essays facilitate researched (referenced) writing.
2. Presentations in some modules test students’ ability to develop an argument verbally.
3. Formative assessment – presentations, class discussion – provide feedback so students can ascertain their progress.
4. The Simulation Exercise tests a range of skills including role-playing and team work.
5. The Dissertation tests the ability to research for and write an extended piece of work.
Programme Outcomes

Cognitive Skills

1. Demonstrate critical thinking, including the ability to form an argument, detect fallacies, and martial evidence, about key issues in diplomacy and international relations;
2. Linguistic competence;
3. Distinguish substantive and methodological issues;
4. Grasp the distinction between normative and non-normative issues.
5. Accurately employ empirical evidence.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Preparation for tutorials (skills 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10);
2. Attendance and participation in the seminar (skills 1, 3, 5 and 10)
3. Tutorial participation (especially skills 4 and 7).
4. Use of moodle and other web resources (skills 3, 5, 6 and 8).
5. Organisation of the course (sequential development of arguments and introduction of material) (skills 3 and 5).

Assessment Strategy

1. Module essays (especially skills 1 and 5).
2. Presentations (especially skills 1, 3, 4, 5).
3. Formative assessment – presentations, class discussion (especially skills 1, 3, 4 and 5).
4. Simulation exercise (especially skills 1, 2 and 4);
5. Dissertation (all skills).
Programme Outcomes

Practical/Transferable Skills

1. Engage in conceptual analysis.
2. Write a coherent piece of work.
3. Appraise published work.
4. Communicate verbally.
5. Assess opposing points of view.
6. Use effectively the internet.
7. Make a presentation.
8. Undertake research.
9. Manage time.
10. Work in a group as part of a collective.

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Preparation for tutorials (skills 1, 2, 3, 7 and 9).
2. Attendance and participation in the seminar (skills 1, 3, 5 and 9).
3. Tutorial participation (especially skills 4 and 7).
4. Use of moodle and other web resources (skills 3, 5, 6 and 8).
5. Organisation of the course (sequential development of arguments and introduction of material) (skills 3 and 5).

Assessment Strategy

1. Unseen examinations (skills 1, 2, 5 and 10).
2. Informal (formative) feedback on class participation (skill 4).
3. Simulation exercise (especially skill 10).
4. Dissertation (skills 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9).
External Reference Points
Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each course unit/module can be found in the departmental or programme handbook. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed annually by the University of Buckingham and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency.
Date of Production
Date approved by School Learning and Teaching Committee
Date approved by School Board of Study
Date approved by University Learning and Teaching Committee
Date of Annual Review

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

MA United Nations and Diplomatic Studies

PMAF1PUNDS / Full Time / January Entry
Term 1
Winter
Diplomacy [L7/20U] (HPFDIPL)
International Organisations [L7/20U] (HPFIORG)
Term 2
Spring
Global Political Communication [L7/20U] (HPFGLPC)
The European Union and its External Policies [L7/20U] (HPFEUEP)
Term 3
Summer
Dissertation [L7/40U] (HPFDISN)
Diplomacy Simulation Exercise [L7/20U] (HPFDSEX)
Term 4
Autumn
Great Power Politics [L7/20U] (HPFGPPO)
Conflict Resolution [L7/20U] (HPFCRES)

 

MA United Nations and Diplomatic Studies

PMAF1PUNDS / Full Time / September Entry
Term 1
Autumn
Great Power Politics [L7/20U] (HPFGPPO)
Conflict Resolution [L7/20U] (HPFCRES)
Term 2
Winter
Diplomacy [L7/20U] (HPFDIPL)
International Organisations [L7/20U] (HPFIORG)
Term 3
Spring
Global Political Communication [L7/20U] (HPFGLPC)
The European Union and its External Policies [L7/20U] (HPFEUEP)
Term 4
Summer
Dissertation [L7/40U] (HPFDISN)
Diplomacy Simulation Exercise [L7/20U] (HPFDSEX)
Postgraduate Examination