Name of Programme
MA Security, Intelligence and Diplomacy
Final Award
MA
Location
Buckingham
Awarding Institution/Body
University Of Buckingham
Teaching Institution
University Of Buckingham
School of Study
School of Humanities and Social Sciences [Economics and International Studies]
Programme Code(s)
PMAF1PID / Full Time / 1 Year
Professional Body Accreditation
Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement (SBS)
See QAA’s Masters Degree characteristics. (Note: no subject specific Masters benchmark statement exists for this programme at the present time.)
Admission Criteria
Good first degree OR relevant professional experience
Applicable Cohort(s)
January, April & September
FHEQ Level
7
UCAS Code
Summary of Programme
The MA in Security, Intelligence and Diplomacy combines elements from our existing Security and Intelligence MA and our Diplomacy programmes. Like all of our MA programmes, it aims to help to prepare graduates for careers in foreign and other ministries, international organisations, international journalism and global civil society organisations or for further research. Areas of study include intelligence and international security since 1939; intelligence, tradecraft and machinery; case studies in intelligence success and failure; international law and diplomacy; foreign policy analysis; global diplomacy; security challenges and other global issues. The modules are taught intensively in lectures, seminars and small group tutorials; they assume little prior knowledge but rapidly bring students to an advanced level of understanding. Buckingham is a small academic community and students have personal and frequent access to their instructors. The programme is also suitable for those without a specific career aim in mind but who wish to acquire an advanced understanding of these subjects.
Educational Aims of the Programme
1. To build upon the successful, professionally orientated MA in Global Affairs by giving students an additional degree choice that enables them to have a sharper focus on diplomacy while retaining some of the core elements of the Global Affairs MA.
2. More generally, to continue to work towards the longer term strategic goal of developing an integrated programme of graduate courses in global politics, including the existing MAs in Global Affairs and Security and Intelligence Studies and the MA in Diplomacy.
3. To make optimal use of the academic knowledge of staff in the Department who have published in the area of diplomacy and had relevant practical experience.
4. To provide students with a sound knowledge of key historical, legal, security and political aspects of diplomacy
5. To help to prepare students for a range of possible careers relating to international affairs, including diplomacy, international governmental and nongovernmental organisations and Ministry of Defence work by giving them relevant background knowledge and opportunities to meet practitioners.
Programme Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

1. Demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge in security, intelligence and diplomacy and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights
2. Acquire a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and advanced scholarship
3. Understanding of the processes of international policy-making and diplomacy in a range of areas
4. An understanding of the principal issues revolving around the security and intelligence debate in the UK.
5. A macro-level understanding of the key global geopolitical threats both internal and external to the UK in the contemporary world
6. An appraisal of the relative strengths and weaknesses of different elements of intelligence gathering tradecraft and an ability to formulate sensible policy recommendations

Teaching/Learning Strategy

Lectures, seminars, small group tutorials, role playing workshops and one-to-one discussions and feedback.

Assessment Strategy

Courses will employ a range of assessment criteria. In all cases this will include coursework and presentations. Three modules (Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Analysis and International Law and Diplomacy) will also require students to submit a case study involving a detailed scrutiny of how diplomatic techniques and processes functioned in a specific policy-making environment. There will also be a 30 credit dissertation requiring students to engage in detailed research, including the use of primary source materials.
Programme Outcomes

Cognitive Skills

1. Display originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in security, intelligence and diplomacy
2. Acquire a conceptual understanding that enables them to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in security, intelligence and diplomacy

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1. Essays and projects enable students to hone their research techniques and skills
2. Project work and exercises involving multiple disparate sources of information help to develop skills in forming assessments and judgements from sometimes conflicting or incomplete information sources
3. Seminars and group exercises involving complex or controversial issues will foster debating skills and allow students to develop abilities to evolve and adapt their viewpoints
4. Essays, exercises and project work will require judgements and recommendations to be pulled from the available information, emulating real situations in policy roles

Assessment Strategy

Courses will employ a range of assessment criteria. In all cases this will include coursework and presentations. Three modules (Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Analysis and International Law and Diplomacy) will also require students to submit a case study involving a detailed scrutiny of how diplomatic techniques and processes functioned in a specific policy-making environment. There will also be a 30 credit dissertation requiring students to engage in detailed research, including the use of primary source materials.
Programme Outcomes

Practical/Transferable Skills

1. Conduct research, including advanced information retrieval and assessment appropriate to the internet age
2.Draft, edit and present effectively
3.Formulate and communicate policy ideas and proposals effectively
4.Plan and manage time, sometimes meeting challenging deadlines
5. Utilise developed IT skills

Teaching/Learning Strategy

1.General guidance and team-support mechanisms on how best to retrieve information from library and other sources, and how to evaluate multiple sources available through the internet and elsewhere
2. Essays, team projects and presentations in various situations
3. Seminars and exercises in which students are encouraged to settle on policy decisions and communicate these effectively to the group
4. Exercises and projects which will sometimes involve challenging time pressures, emulating real scenarios
5. Use of multiple IT mechanisms and skills

Assessment Strategy

Courses will employ a range of assessment criteria. In all cases this will include coursework and presentations. Three modules (Diplomacy, Foreign Policy Analysis and International Law and Diplomacy) will also require students to submit a case study involving a detailed scrutiny of how diplomatic techniques and processes functioned in a specific policy-making environment. There will also be a 30 credit dissertation requiring students to engage in detailed research, including the use of primary source materials.
External Reference Points
• Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (Link);
• Relevant Subject Benchmark Statement(s) (Link);
• Other (list)
Please note: This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each course unit/module can be found in the departmental or programme handbook. The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed annually by the University of Buckingham and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency.
Date of Production
Date approved by School Learning and Teaching Committee
Date approved by School Board of Study
Date approved by University Learning and Teaching Committee
Date of Annual Review

 

PROGRAMME STRUCTURES

MA Security, Intelligence and Diplomacy

PMAF1PID / Full Time / April Entry
Term 1
Spring
Case Studies in Intelligence Success and Failure [L7/30U] (HPFCSIS)
Security Challenges & Other Global Issues [L7/15U] (HPFSCGI)
Term 2
Summer
Dissertation [L7/30U] (HPFDISS)
Term 3
Autumn
Terrorism and Counter Terrorism [L7/30U] (HPFTACT)
Foreign Policy Analysis [L7/15U] (HPFFPAY)
Term 4
Winter
Diplomacy [L7/30U] (HPFDIPY)
Intelligence History, Tradecraft and Machinery [L7/30U] (HPFIHTM)

 

MA Security, Intelligence and Diplomacy

PMAF1PID / Full Time / January Entry
Term 1
Winter
Diplomacy [L7/30U] (HPFDIPY)
Intelligence History, Tradecraft and Machinery [L7/30U] (HPFIHTM)
Term 2
Spring
Case Studies in Intelligence Success and Failure [L7/30U] (HPFCSIS)
Security Challenges & Other Global Issues [L7/15U] (HPFSCGI)
Term 3
Summer
Dissertation [L7/30U] (HPFDISS)
Term 4
Autumn
Terrorism and Counter Terrorism [L7/30U] (HPFTACT)
Foreign Policy Analysis [L7/15U] (HPFFPAY)

 

MA Security, Intelligence and Diplomacy

PMAF1PID / Full Time / September Entry
Term 1
Autumn
Terrorism and Counter Terrorism [L7/30U] (HPFTACT)
Foreign Policy Analysis [L7/15U] (HPFFPAY)
Term 2
Winter
Diplomacy [L7/30U] (HPFDIPY)
Intelligence History, Tradecraft and Machinery [L7/30U] (HPFIHTM)
Term 3
Spring
Case Studies in Intelligence Success and Failure [L7/30U] (HPFCSIS)
Security Challenges & Other Global Issues [L7/15U] (HPFSCGI)
Term 4
Summer
Dissertation [L7/30U] (HPFDISS)
Postgraduate Examination