Dr Emily Mattacola

Lecturer in Psychology

emily.mattacola@buckingham.ac.uk

Emily joined the Psychology Department in 2015 and delivers the core modules of Research Methods & Statistics and Health  Psychology on the undergraduate programme. She is the Programme Director for the MSc Health Psychology course, on which she teaches Physiology, Epidemiology and Psychoimmunology, accepting its first intake in September 2017. She supervises both undergraduate and postgraduate research projects, including DPhil students. She is a Chartered Psychologist (CPsychol), Chartered Scientist (CSci), and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (FHEA).

Emily’s primary area of research interest is psychoneuroendocrinology, particularly the biological mechanisms through which social support and stress are able to enact influence on long-term health conditions. Emily utilises mixed methods approaches and has expertise in the collection and analysis of tissue samples, questionnaire design and delivery, and qualitative semi-structured interviewing. Emily’s PhD studied the impact of social support and bonding on glycaemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Her current research projects include the assessment of the effectiveness of an online health service for people living with chronic pain, factors disclosure of HIV status to healthcare professionals, and the impact of sexually explicit material on sexual behaviours in young people.

Beyond research and teaching, Emily is an undergraduate Admissions Tutor for Psychology, working on the Admissions Team with Rosie Johnson and Dr Alan Martin. She also sits on the committee of the East Midlands Branch of the British Psychological Society.

Publications and grants

Journal articles

  • Walker, E. & Doe, E. (in preparation), “’Let’s talk about sex’: Investigating the relationship between sexually explicit material and risky sexual behaviour in the UK”
  • Gillett, J. & E. Mattacola, “The moderating factors of neuroticism and extraversion on pain anticipation”, British Journal of Pain (2017), DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/2049463717728039. Read more in our Publication of the week section (24 August 2017)
  • Doe, E. (in preparation), “A comparison of adolescents with/without type 1 diabetes on peer support and psychosocial functioning”
  • Doe, E. (in preparation), “Exploring the biological effects of social bonding on glycaemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes”
  • Doe, E. (in preparation), “‘They think it’s helpful, but it’s not’: A qualitative analysis of the experience of peer support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes”
  • Doe, E., “An analysis of the relationships between peer support and diabetes outcomes in adolescents with type 1 diabetes”, Journal of Health Psychology (2016), DOI: 1359105316656228
  • Doe, E., Allen, S., Dobson, M. & Huber, J.W., “Social support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review of social support intervention studies”, Psychology & Health 28 (Suppl. 1) (2013)
  • Doe, E., “First steps: Research projects”, Qualitative Methods in Psychology Bulletin 16 (2013)

Conferences

  • Midlands Health Psychology Annual Conference (March 2017): “50 shades of pain: The mediation of pain experience”
  • 30th Conference of the European Health Psychology Society and BPS Division of Health Psychology Joint Conference (August 2016): “A comparison of adolescents with/without type 1 diabetes on peer support and psychosocial functioning”
  • BPS Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference (September 2015): “’They think it’s helpful, but it’s not’: The problem of social support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus”
  • 28th Conference of the European Health Psychology Society (August 2014): “The impact of illness centrality on social support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes”
  • Midlands Health Psychology Annual Conference (February 2014): “Seeing past the diabetes: illness centrality in peer relationships in adolescents with type 1 diabetes”
  • BPS Division of Health Psychology Annual Conference (September 2013): “Stress in the ‘rabbit warren’: understanding the impact of the physical and social environment on nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)”
  • 27th Conference of the European Health Psychology Society (July 2013): “Social support in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review of social support intervention studies”

Grants

  • Chancellor’s Award: £1,000 awarded in 2013
  • Institute of Health & Wellbeing PhD Scholarship: £40,500 2012-2015
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